Monthly Archives: December 2013

How early admission is changing the college application process

PrincetonArchIMG_4692When it comes to college application deadlines, November is fast becoming the new normal. Every year the number of high school students applying to college early via Early Action and Early Decision programs is increasing. Not only are more students applying early, more are being accepted in the first round. That means the whole timing of the college admissions process is changing.

Savvy students know they can increase their chances of admission at highly selective schools by applying early. Last year Harvard accepted 18% of its Early Action applicants, compared with just 5.9% of its total applicants that year. Princeton accepted a full 21% in the early round, compared with its much lower rate of 7.9% overall. Yale accepted 14.3%, in contrast to 6.7% overall.

Numbers for this year are still coming in for many schools, but Harvard’s Early Action acceptance rate is up about three percentage points, Yale’s is up one percent, while Princeton’s is up slightly less than one.

Although some schools have tried to gloss over the obvious conclusion—arguing that many students who apply early are academically superior—it seems clear that students who apply early boost their chances of success.

Read more

Anarchy & Ivy: Allen Ginsberg’s days at Columbia

kill-your-darlings-680Daniel Radcliffe’s new movie about Allen Ginsberg offers us a chance to reexamine the poet’s student years, raising the question: what is education, really?

The movie “Kill Your Darlings,” starring Danielle Radcliffe as the young Allen Ginsberg, is an engrossing biopic that follows the future Beat poet through his student years at Columbia University. It was there that Ginsberg, as a 17-year-old freshman in 1943-44, met soon-to-be Beat writers Jack Kerouac and William Burroughs, along with their circle of bohemian friends. He also spent a lot of time reading, writing and breaking rules. The last of those activities got him into trouble with the university—trouble that almost kept him from graduating.

Today we may laugh at the minor infraction that actually triggered Ginsberg’s suspension—an obscene phrase traced in the dust of his dorm room window—an incident described in Ginsberg’s letters, though not depicted in the film. But his involvement with a group of friends that included thieves and drug addicts, as well as a brilliant young Columbia student named Lucien Carr, who ended up murdering another member of their circle, is certainly troubling.

“Kill Your Darlings” devotes plenty of screen time to Ginsberg’s relationship with Carr, and to the murder, a controversial chapter in Beat history. Yet it barely touches on another important relationship—that of the young Ginsberg and his real-life professor, literary critic Lionel Trilling.

Read more