Author Archives: Mona Molarsky

College Visits: Save Yourself Time, Money and Heartache

Harvard CollegeAre you a high school freshman or sophomore, or the parent of someone who is? If so, you’re probably wondering about college visits. When’s the best time to start? And where to begin?

On the one hand, you don’t need to hit the road just yet. On the other, it is time to start planning. Time you invest now will save you lots of time and stress later. If you don’t plan ahead, it won’t be a pretty picture. I’ve seen it many times.

Every fall, I hear from panicky seniors, scrambling to complete their college applications. Just as they’re writing their essays, many are still trying to firm up their college lists. Some add and drop colleges on a daily basis. By the time December rolls around, the colleges they end up applying to are often ones they haven’t visited, while colleges they did visit have been scratched from the list.

This leaves the students, as well as the moms and dads, playing a frantic game of catch-up, as they try to figure out how to schedule last-minute college visits and interviews during late-fall weekends and winter breaks. At this point, there is never enough time to get it all done. Sometimes, even favored schools fall by the wayside amidst the chaos.

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How to Ace Those Supplemental Essays

How to ace those supplemental essaysSeniors, have you written your supplemental essays yet? If not, it’s time to get going. Before you start writing, here are a few things to consider. The supplemental questions colleges ask may sound simple, but answering well is harder than you think.

It’s easy to rattle off a bunch of truisms—much more challenging to say something fresh that will hold your reader’s interest. To do a good job, you need to get out of your own head and into the heads of the folks in the admissions office. Ask yourself: Why are they asking me this? What are they trying to find out?

The short answer is they’re trying to find out if you and the college are a good fit. Schools use various questions to determine this. I’ll describe two common ones below. But first bear in mind that different schools and different questions require different kinds of responses.

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Are You Ready for Junior Year?

High school juniorHigh school has changed in the last few years—and not just because of technology. The college admissions process has become more intense, and the time frame has moved forward. Most students who want to attend selective colleges now apply for early admission in November of senior year.

That means juniors—and even sophomores—are visiting more campuses, doing so earlier and getting more serious about their college lists.

I’m urging juniors and their parents to heed this trend and get on board. It would be lovely to experience 11th grade without focusing much attention on college. But, if you’re hoping to attend one America’s top 50 schools, that’s no longer wise. With that in mind, you’ll need to juggle multiple steps of the process at the same time. You’ll be thinking about test prep while researching schools and planning your campus visits. Getting a head-start in junior year was once a luxury: now it’s pretty much a necessity. Here’s a rundown of what you’ll need to do.

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How to Manage Your Senior Year

For many high school students, the fall of senior year will be the busiest semester ever. But it doesn’t have to be your most stressful. You can minimize its challenges by planning the coming months carefully and putting all important dates on your calendar right now.

Choose your classes wisely
Make sure you’re on-track to complete all necessary classes this year. Check with the school counselor to be certain you’re not missing any requirements. Sign up for the most challenging classes you can handle. It goes without saying you’ll need to work hard and get solid grades to get into a good college.

Register and prep for any outstanding tests
If there are still tests—SAT, ACT or any others—you need to take at this point, register for them immediately and start prepping. Remember that many of the most selective colleges require the SAT Subject Tests (known as the SAT 2s) in addition to the other test scores!

Complete your personal essay
If you haven’t written your personal essay yet, block out the time and do so now. Start working on this project in early September, making sure you allow yourself enough time for several false starts. It’s not uncommon for students to write eight or ten drafts before they produce a compelling piece of writing. If you need help, don’t wait to seek it. After you have a strong draft, allow plenty of time for editing, copyediting and proofreading. See Essay Tips.

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Personal Essay Tips for Your College Apps

A good personal essay should present an aspect of your personality that is not obvious from the rest of your college application. The admissions officers will see your grades and test scores, a list of your extracurricular activities and your awards and achievements. They will also read the letters of recommendation your teachers have written for you. But they will not see the three-dimensional person you actually are. The purpose of your essay is to provide them with a deeper understanding of what makes you tick.

Selective colleges are looking for students who will bring creative energy and interesting thinking to their campus. Of course, they are also looking for evidence that a student is mature, socially conscious and will become a positive force in their community. The more your essay can convince the reader of these things, the more successful it will be.

Conflict is the engine of all good writing

To be successful, a personal essay must first hold the reader’s attention. To do that, you will need a bit of drama. You may have heard that every good piece of writing contains a conflict. Will Ahab avenge Moby Dick—or will the whale destroy him? Will Romeo and Juliet manage to come together, despite their families’ antipathies? If the writer presents a compelling problem or question, the reader will want to read on for the answer.

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Dealing with the College Wait List

If you were wait-listed at your first-choice college, you’re not alone. Every year tens of thousands of hopeful high school seniors hear they’ve been  wait-listed. It can be a rough experience. But it doesn’t have to feel that bad, if you have a strategy for dealing with it.

Wait-listing has become common, but many students and their families still don’t know how to handle the situation. That’s why I revisit the topic each year.

Most colleges use wait lists to manage what they call their yield. That’s the number of students who actually end up enrolling. The yield is always lower than the number of students offered admission. That’s because some students get accepted at more than one school and end up turning down several offers. Each year, as more students apply to longer lists of schools, the number of students who accept offers drops at even the most prestigious colleges. This phenomenon can wreak havoc with a school’s yield. To protect their yields, more colleges are turning to longer waiting lists.

Some schools also use wait lists for political purposes. They may be reluctant to insult an affluent or well-connected alumni by rejecting his or her child. To take some of the sting out of it, they’ll wait-list the applicant. If your local congressman’s trouble-making kid with a B- average gets wait listed, that may say more about the parent’s relationship with the school than about his kid’s chances of getting in.

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Rethinking Extracurricular Activities

College prep: internshipsWhen it comes to extracurricular activities, most high school students and parents think they know what’s required. To get into a good college, you need more than good grades and test scores. You must fill your schedule with extracurricular activities—the more, the better. If you can afford it, your summers should involve taking advanced academic classes on college campuses and “community service” trips to help poor people in remote corners of the globe. Right?

Actually, half right. But also half wrong. As so often happens, popular stereotypes based on just part of the picture are misleading. You really need to understand the whole picture to get it straight. But what is the whole picture?

There’s no doubt that top colleges emphasize high GPAs and test scores when making their admissions decisions. They also want to see that students have challenged themselves by taking honors or AP classes, if they were offered at their schools. Students and parents have that piece of college admissions race right. At selective colleges, these sorts of achievements are good. In fact, if you want to be in the running, they’re pretty much required.

It’s the other piece of the package that so many people don’t quite get. That’s the piece involving how you spend your time outside of class. Today most students talk about this in terms of “extracurricular activities.” It’s a convenient phrase but not always the best one. It encourages us to narrow our thinking, just when we should be expanding it.

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Financial Aid: Now’s the Time to File the FAFSA

Student fills out the FAFSAHave you filed your FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) yet? If not, you’d be smart to do so soon. It’s the single most important filing for students seeking financial aid for college. Now’s the time to file the FAFSA. Here’s why:

This year the Department of Education has made the FAFSA available to students and their parents on October first, a full three months earlier than in previous years. They’ve announced that FAFSA filing will begin in October in coming years too.

For those hoping to get financial aid for college, that’s a big plus. It means students who file early may receive word of their financial aid packages in the late fall or early winter. That gives students plenty of time to consider their options before choosing which college they’ll attend.

I say “may” because the actual financial aid packages are put together by the individual colleges, not the Department of Education. Each college works according to its own deadlines. Some will move their timing up to complement the FAFSA’s early filing option. Others will not.

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What Colleges Really Want

What colleges really wantBesides good grades and test scores, what are top colleges looking for when they select their freshman class? Students and parents often get it wrong. Unsurprisingly, they have trouble cutting through the myths. That’s why it pays to ask.

At the Fourth Annual NYC Directors of Admission Panel this week, senior admissions staff from some of New York’s most selective colleges answered questions about what they want. Two, in particular, impressed me with their clarity and candor.

Cooper Union, long known for its high-quality programs in art, architecture and engineering, as well as its appealingly low cost, had an acceptance rate of just 13% last year. That’s partly because tuition is subsidized, making it one of the most affordable and coveted schools in New York. It’s also because it offers a fine technical education, right in the heart of one of the great cities of the world.

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